About us

The NEW MOMENT Gallery has long been a cult location on the cultural map of Belgrade. Its creative, innovative and visual identity has been particularly prominent in the fields of contemporary design, advertising and communications. Dragan Sakan, a man of ideas and visions, founded the Gallery in 1995 as part of his New Moment advertising agency, daring to believe that advertising should be transformed into ARTvertising. Convinced that “ideas are all around us”, he created the Gallery as a place of inspiration. The fact that his creative dreamers infused new energy into considerable expansion of their activities in the field of visual arts is the best evidence that the Gallery, thanks to innovative ideas, has become a contemporary institution that is in constant motion and on a perpetual upswing. Now, building on the existing creative content and consistently exciting happenings,they want to constantly change and advance, to meet the challenge of new subjects and new projects.


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The NEW MOMENT Gallery has long been a cult location on the cultural map of Belgrade. Its creative, innovative and visual identity has been particularly prominent in the fields of contemporary design, advertising and communications. Dragan Sakan, a man of ideas and visions, founded the Gallery in 1995 as part of his New Moment advertising agency, daring to believe that advertising should be transformed into ARTvertising. Convinced that “ideas are all around us”, he created the Gallery as a place of inspiration. The fact that his creative dreamers infused new energy into considerable expansion of their activities in the field of visual arts is the best evidence that the Gallery, thanks to innovative ideas, has become a contemporary institution that is in constant motion and on a perpetual upswing. Now, building on the existing creative content and consistently exciting happenings,they want to constantly change and advance, to meet the challenge of new subjects and new projects.

Fortunately, these are not the kind of cultural workers beset by apathy as a result of exhausting their energy before running the lap of their desires. The desires of the protagonists of this Gallery are pulsating with untamable imagination and powerful inspiration. That’s how the new permanent visual collection came into being, enlivening the idea about the enduring presence of art works which embody high artistic values. The artists are represented through exceptional individual talent and refined sensibility. That is another step towards the presence of visual magic. In the midst of a banal reality, the works of visual artists on display will present an alternative to the type of creation that leaves the aesthetic sphere and betrays aesthetic values. Furthermore, this alternative confirms such values and pushes the envelope far behond the superficial level and above the dark horizon of reality.

The permanent collection is conceived as far more than the conventional imprimatur for superior artwork bogged down in its own static conservatism. To avoid this scenario, the Gallery will be improved and enlarged until it reaches a convincing and relevant balance. In this way, an open-minded attitude and critical selection will enable the presence of the most valuable achievements of visual art, which will be far removed from fashionable trends. Thus the cultural scene in Belgrade will be enriched by those values that produce a strong creative impulse and help embody active communication.

Visual artists, as the wizards and most vital element of urban sensibility, will find a safe haven and inner peace in this Gallery. In this way downtown Belgrade will gain a place of magnetism, where encounters with artistic whispers of freedom are possible, empowering an essential format of artistic existence. The intention to host at least four original exhibitions by local and foreign visual artists every year, as well as the planned publication of monographs for remarkable contemporary artists, should be taken as signs of a firm resolution to follow the creative undertakings of key artists and make public the exploratory insights that can become important material for understanding current trends in the visual arts.

The Friends of the Gallery club, its friends, advisors, critics and collectors, should be recognized as a warm current of art lovers who are doing everything in their power to defend the dignity of artistic values, as well as the style of human existence. Frequent professional debates can improve the level of understanding of all human values. Annual auctions of just ten or twenty pieces of high art should be seen, more than anything, as being an act of artistic influence, rather than being directed towards lucrative arrangements. In this way, the Gallery will stand in stark contrast to those institutions that reside far from any kind of business strategy, entrepreneur spirit, pluralistic openness and new techniques for communication.

It would be useful to recruit traditional media as indispensible partners of the Gallery, in addition to online communication, because the media hold a lot of sway in terms of shaping the public image of the Gallery and relaying its mission to the public. For this reason, it would be desirable and appropriate to have a public relations professional from the Gallery liaise with journalists active in this sub-field of creative work.

Most importantly, it can be expected that no one will ever leave the Gallery without experiencing an inner transformation, without feeling creative fulfillment. This is a sure-fire way of turning events in the Gallery into unforgettable, once-in-a-lifetime experiences.

Ratko Božović

Current exhibition

online exhibition

Selling

In our selling exhibition you can find masterpieces of art of renowned artists from Serbia and the world. +381 60 4577 456 gallery@newmoment.com

Buying

New Moment Gallery buys works of art of eminent artists from Serbia and the region.

+381 60 4577 456
gallery@newmoment.com


The list of artists whose works we buy


Sava Šumanović (1896–1942)
Petar Dobrović (1890–1942)
Ivan Radović (1894–1973)
Ivan Tabaković (1898–1977)

Petar Lubarda (1907–1974)

Olga Jevrić (1922–2014)

Branko Filipović Filo (1924–1997)
Radomir Damnjanović Damnjan (1935)
Borislav Iljovski (1942–2013)

Leonid Šejka (1932–1970)
Miro Glavurtić (1932)
Svetozar Samurović (1928–2001)

Petar Omčikus (1926)
Kosara Bokšan (1925–2009)
Miodrag Đurić Dado (1933–2010)
Ljubodrag Popović Ljuba (1934)
Vladimir Veličković (1935)

Tomislav Kauzlarić (1934–1992)

Radomir Reljić (1938–2006)

Halil Tikveša (1935)
Radovan Kragulj (1935)
Slavoljub Radojčić Caja (1942)
Đorđije Crnčević (1943–2013)
Era Milivojević (1944)

 

Slobodanka Stupar (1947)

Aleksandar Cvetković (1947)

Milija Belić (1954)
Mrđan Bajić (1957)
Saša Pančić (1965)
Dejan Kaluđerović (1972)
Ivan Grubanov (1976)
Petar Mirković (1978)
Marina Marković (1983)

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BOOGIE - promotion of the book Belgrade Guide and exhibition of photography

On Friday 24th, 2017, New Moment gallery will exhibit new photographs by one of the most famous street photographer today - Boogie. All the photos are taken in Belgrade and at the same time New Moment will present Boogie's new book - Belgrade Guide, published by New Moment Gallery. 

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On Friday 24th, 2017, New Moment gallery will exhibit new photographs by one of the most famous street photographer today - Boogie. All the photos are taken in Belgrade and at the same time New Moment will present Boogie's new book - Belgrade Guide, published by New Moment Gallery. 



INTERVIEW: LAZAR SAKAN,

owner of the New Moment Gallery

Your gallery has a long tradition. What innovations are expected in the next period?

In the coming period, we want to transform the Gallery into a modern institution capable of supporting art and art practitioners, not just for commercial success. Of course, the commercial side will have to remain in focus because the Gallery must support itself, but this won’t be the priority.

I suppose that, as part of this, you have a program to serve as a guideline.

The program is very simple. The Gallery will initially have a permanent collection, which will be determined by our present options, but we anticipate that this will change and improve in quality until it reaches the level we want.
The emphasis is on the quality of the art works and that is the central tenet that we want to preserve. The permanent collection will be summarized in a catalogue, while all the Gallery’s holdings will be displayed on the Gallery’s website.

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Your gallery has a long tradition. What innovations are expected in the next period?

In the coming period, we want to transform the Gallery into a modern institution capable of supporting art and art practitioners, not just for commercial success. Of course, the commercial side will have to remain in focus because the Gallery must support itself, but this won’t be the priority.

I suppose that, as part of this, you have a program to serve as a guideline.

The program is very simple. The Gallery will initially have a permanent collection, which will be determined by our present options, but we anticipate that this will change and improve in quality until it reaches the level we want.
The emphasis is on the quality of the art works and that is the central tenet that we want to preserve. The permanent collection will be summarized in a catalogue, while all the Gallery’s holdings will be displayed on the Gallery’s website.
During the year, the Gallery will mount at least four exhibitions of contemporary artists from this country and abroad, attempting to follow key trends in modern art.
Once or twice per year, we will hold auctions-of art works but, unlike the usual auctions, we will offer only ten to twenty pieces of high quality artwork at the most.

Do you anticipate any other activities?

The Gallery will also publish monographs on certain artists who we feel merit being showcased in this way. These won't necessarily be monographs of older artists or those who are already deceased – the focus will be on living artists who are at the top of their game.
The Gallery will also bring together a number of artists, culture workers and collectors through the Friends of the Gallery club. In New York I visited a gallery that displays only three paintings on the premises, but it has a long list of customers for whom it procures top-tier artwork. This is something we want to emulate.

Will the gallery evaluate and purchase art works from the public?

Yes, we will purchase artwork, but we won't do valuation and certification, because we believe that this is the role of an official state institution should, not a private gallery.
The works we purchase will become part of the permanent collection, which will increase the overall quality of the collection, as I have already said. But we will also purchase works for our friends and for collectors, who will play an active role in our operations by providing advice, making suggestions and displaying their own works.

As a final question, I want to ask you when will the Gallery start operations?

At the beginning of March 2015, we will begin with active purchases of works from the region and beyond, organization of the first exhibition, printing the catalogue for the permanent collection, publication of the Gallery website and the Online Gallery.



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PORTO MONTENEGRO

The New Moment Gallery in Belgrade will exhibit its permanent collection in Porto Montenegro Gallery in Tivat.

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The New Moment Gallery in Belgrade will exhibit its permanent collection in Porto Montenegro Gallery in Tivat, from September the 1st to the 21st, 2015. Visitors will have the opportunity to see graphics, drawings and paintings by prominent contemporary artists of all styles from the second half of the 20th and in the beginning of the 21st century, including: Erro, Jože Ciuha, Petar Lubarda, Ljuba Popović, Vladimir Veličković, Halil Tikveša, Edo Murtić, Dušan Džamonja, Petar Omčikus, artistic group IRWIN and others.



EXHIBITION BY MILIJA BELIC:
Having Tea With Josef

– October 2015

Milija Belic (1954) is a prominent multimedia artist and art theorist. He graduated from the Faculty of Fine Arts in Belgrade (1978)

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Exhibition by Milija Belic - October 2015
HAVING TEA WITH JOSEF

Milija Belic (1954) is a prominent multimedia artist and art theorist. He graduated from the Faculty of Fine Arts in Belgrade (1978) and earned his PhD in Aesthetics and Science of Art at the Sorbonne in Paris (1994). His artistic expression is based on the principles of constructivism, minimalism and so-called geometric art; where artists use straight lines and geometric forms in order to achieve the universal visual language and aesthetics of total art.

He has won several awards and recognitions. His works can be found at the National Library in Paris, at the Satoru Sato Art Museum (Tome, Japan), the Museum of Contemporary Art in Belgrade, the Institute for Culture of Vojvodina (Novi Sad), and in many galleries and private collections at home and abroad.

 

Milija Belic on the nature of creativity
interview by Ljubomir Eric, Prof. PhD

March – April 2015

Lj. E.: Mr. Belic, you did your PhD in Aesthetics at the Sorbonne and at the same time you are a painter, sculptor and graphic designer. Do you advocate any particular theory about the nature of creativity since we know there are several?

M. B.: The PhD came as a kind of collateral damage. Namely, the title itself was never the main motivation, nor was a possible career that could come as a result. The PhD thesis had been shaping itself for years before I decided to formally put it into an administrative framework. In Belgrade, during my studies at the Faculty of Fine Arts, and afterwards, there was no understanding for my theoretical work so my stay in Paris and a fortuitous contact with the university encouraged me to continue, deepen and finish the thesis which had been growing for years, in the greatest intimacy. So, for me it was an opportunity to bring to light the theory of creativity for which I, to my great and pleasant surprise, found support and confirmation in numerous books, especially by French authors, and then from professors at the Sorbonne. It all began while I was still a student with questions about the essence of the creative act and the need to interpret developments in contemporary art; to perceive a context that would enable a revolution of modern painting. In this way I wanted to pave the way and create a solid base for my future work in painting, and later in sculpture. I accepted the attitude of modern artists that creativity is a continuation of the natural process of creation, where artists are no longer imitators of natural forms, but assume the role of the demiurge, identifying themselves with creative forces and principles of nature itself. The basic motto of modern artists was: I do not create by nature, I create as nature. The emergence of abstract art thus opened doors to the theory of Jungian archetypes of the collective unconscious, according to which each of us, in our genes, carries a number of archetypal images whose principles and mathematical structure we realize and recognize just by being born. Jung even assumed the existence of an extreme archetypal level, where animate and inanimate matter equate, calling it unus mundus. Developed intuition of modern artists found in these archetypes is an inexhaustible source of meaning and creative potential. This explains the incredible lightness of communication, when it comes to, for example, geometric abstraction and its understanding and receptivity to all cultures and races.

Lj. E.: You mentioned geometric abstraction. Where and how did the idea on which it is based originate and is it the essence of your artistic identity?

M. B.: In historic terms, geometric abstraction as a movement occurred exactly a century ago, reactualizing Neo-Platonic ideas in the works of Piet Mondrian, the Dutch group De Stijl, Kazimir Meljevic and Russian avant-garde artists, primarily constructivists. Since then, it has been undergoing continuous reincarnation and metamorphosis, developing a global framework and becoming, in a way, a symbol or emblem of our society of high rationality and high technology. Although geometry, as a reflection or image of cosmic order (cosmos taken as an equivalent to a well-ordered whole) and a source of aesthetic emotion, has been present in human achievements, primarily in art, since the beginning of human civilization, it was only in the 20th century that awareness was developed of aesthetic-philosophical connotations and potentiality that geometry as a meta-language contains. In this way, from the surface membrane of the visible, from the illusion which figurative art had dealt with for centuries, we moved to deeper and more stable layers of reality that do not depend so much on ephemeral effects and which are closer to the principles and essential organization of the universe. This integrated mathematics (part of which is geometry), as the most abstract, most precise and most universal language of nature, is integrated into an aesthetic thought, enabling the idea of total art - the fusion of science and art, to come a step closer to reality. But, I wanted to take a peek behind mathematics itself and find out what forces generate numbers as the basis of mathematical structures. What is it that is, in an ontological sense, older than the very numbers that were the essence of the world for Pythagoreans and as such became the basis of our current numeric (digital) era. So I came up with the concept of rhythm, which contains and combines two fundamental principles: movement and order. Rhythm is, therefore, the order of movement, and as such quantifiable. Nothing in nature nor art can exist without rhythm. We are in a biological sense organized rhythmically (breathing, heartbeat, walking, being awake and asleep); the rotation of planets and galaxies is rhythmic; rhythm is the base of a musical composition. Rhythm is basically, no matter how paradoxical it may sound, a visual composition, primarily through a system of proportion, and then through relationships between other visual elements. The current definition of the universe as a space-time continuum abolishes time and space as absolute and independent categories, so that rhythm can be seen not only in the context of time, but also within physical phenomena; in both a physical and psychological sense. Setting free the rhythm in modern art was crucial to the emancipation of contemporary artistic thought. The enthusiasm that accompanied this statement and that led to the development of theoretical assumptions that I later turned into the PhD thesis is certainly the base of my current artistic engagement.

Lj. E.: It's great that you have mentioned rhythm. I agree that in a man's life rhythm is something of unfathomably great importance, but where is the unconscious, Sigmund Freud, whose humble interpreter I am, would ask?

M. B.: Rhythm is the base of automated processes, both biological and psychological. A whole new science, chronobiology, is precisely about researching these kinds of rhythms, which are essential for the survival of a living organism. By automatism, biological rhythms fall into the category of the unconscious and have a decisive role in recognizing, identifying and generating art forms. Leibniz even went so far as to show that music is actually unconscious mathematics. Freud's research undoubtedly made a significant contribution to the explanation of human behaviour and its original motivation. However, I have always wondered if there is a spiritual sphere in which it is possible, in a way, to overcome the "human factor", to get rid of the ego in the classic Western sense and achieve unity with nature, with the universe, in the way implied by traditional oriental philosophy. These aspirations have been the basis of Mondrian’s approach to art and his new plasticism.

Lj. E.: So have you succeeded? Is one inhibited or encouraged by the kind of father you had or the kind of mother, or even the kind of emotional development that you had? In fact, do you think that heritage plys a part in the field of creative potential?

M. B.: This is exactly the question that was imposed on me while I was young. Can man by the strength of his own will overcome human destiny, inhibitions given to him genetically (except for pathological cases) or through social status or cultural heritage? Or maybe the question itself is the result of a genetically predetermined psychological profile? In any case, I think that individual will is decisive for overcoming obstacles on the path of self-education and determining life goals. If it was only about genetics, descendants of great artists would be great artists too, which is not the case. Predispositions, if they exist at all, are certainly not sufficient. As for my own development, I can say that I grew up in an emotionally stable environment, in an open-minded family. The first creative impulses came in early childhood from my father, who was an amateur writer. So, my first creative impulses (first in the field of writing and then drawing) were welcomed with approval and support within my family, then in school and further afield since my writings and drawings were published in children's magazines and I had received prizes in various contests these magazines organized. These were the first steps on the path of art that appeared to me very early in life as a meaningful path.

Lj. E.: One question to end. How do you see the further development of the visual arts, especially painting and sculpture? We are witnessing great changes, there are several approaches, there is impugnment, competition and fighting for the position of a pioneer, where does it all lead?

M. B.: It is true that our time is quite turbulent in a creative sense. There are greatly diverse tendencies and approaches to art that are the consequence of permanent emancipation of both aesthetic and social consciousness. Boundaries between various disciplines are deleted, not only visual and not only artistic. There are almost no more differences between the perception of paintings and perception of creative photography. Sculpture is programmed on the computer and printed in three dimensions, or shown as a hologram image. Illusion replaces reality. Virtual reality is increasingly becoming an alternative to physical reality. Works are increasingly ephemeral, in the form of ambient installations. Visual art is fused with music, performing arts, ballet. Time and movement are becoming active components of artistic work. Light itself is formed and used as artistic material. There are no more taboos. Not only are there more interdisciplinary projects in arts and more works that cannot be easily classified as either paintings or sculptures, but science itself is being integrated into the domain of art as an object of aesthetic contemplation. Scientific principles are thus becoming an integral part of artistic construction. This developments are due to new technologies, new media and new modes of communication used on a global level, and are changing perspective and understanding of spatial and temporal dimensions and distances. All this fits perfectly with the spirit of our time and offers the potential from which something magnificent can be derived. On the one hand, we see the increasing complexity of the approach to art; on the other hand, we can recognise relaxation on an emotional level, and a spirit of playfulness that is becoming more prevalent in current art; a certain infantilism to which current artists voluntarily agree. A ludic approach to art today offers a new kind of optimism, a new kind of serenity that is increasingly becoming an expression and emblem of humanism of the 21st century.



ERA MILIVOJEVIC:

Still Images

Exhibition by Era Milivojevic Still Images opens on Thursday the June 11th, 2015, at the New Moment Gallery.

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Era Milivojevic: Still Images

Exhibition by Era Milivojevic Still Images opens on Thursday the June 11th, 2015, at the New Moment Gallery.

Slobodan Era Milivojevic (1944) is one of the pioneers of conceptual art in our country. He graduated in painting from the Academy of Fine Arts in Belgrade under the tutorage of Professor Stojan Celic and during the seventies he distinguished himself as the main protagonist of the new art practice, finding his expression in diverse disciplines such as performance, painting, collage, photo and video installations. He has had numerous exhibitions and performances at home and abroad. He has won several prizes and awards, and his works are exhibited in the Museum of Contemporary Art in Belgrade, the Museum of the City of Belgrade and others, as well as in many private collections.

The exhibition is open until June the 30th, 2015.



Contact us

Hilandarska 14, 11000 Belgrade
+381 11 322 99 92
+381 60 4577 456
gallery@newmoment.com